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SUPERVISOR FEDERAL GLOVER FALL/WINTER
2013-2014
Dear Friends,
Our little secret in the Bay Area is that the best weather is in the fall, giving us an Indian Summer into November. But as our weather transitions to brisker, colder and wetter weather, we still are fortunate that wed don't have to suffer the winter snowstorms and freezes prevalent in the midwest and eastern seaboard. The picture above was taken by my Chief of Staff, David Fraser, at the Pittsburg waterfront. It is a fitting photo since the launching of the Northern Waterfront Economic Development Initiative which had its first summit on Jan. 10, 2014 in Antioch.
FALL/WINTER
EditionEDITION 
 
District V includes
the cities of Antioch, Hercules, Martinez, Pinole and Pittsburg, and the communities of Alhambra Valley, Bay Point, Briones, Clyde, Crockett, Mt. View, Pacheco, Port Costa, Reliez Valley, Rodeo, Tormey and Vine Hill
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TABLE OF CONTENTS


District V
Events Calendar

Government meetings
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Subscribe to the District V eGram

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Office of Supervisor Federal Glover
will be closed Labor Day, Sept. 2, 2013 


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MARTINEZ OFFICE
651 Pine Street
(925) 335-8200
FAX: (925) 335-8208

PITTSBURG OFFICE
315 East Leland Road
(925) 432-8142
FAX (925) 427-8142

HERCULES OFFICE
151 Linus Pauling Drive
(510) 262-8800
FAX (510) 262-8808 


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FROM THE SUPERVISORSupervisor

The year gone by:
2013 was busy but 2014 promises to be even better

Despite economic challenges, the Board of Supervisors has been able to accomplish a great deal last year and laid the foundation for an even better year in 2014. 

 

 

Future

Contra Costa County's future lays in the northern waterfront
History-making forum launches supervisor's initiative

Hundreds of people representing business, industry, parks, the cities and state gathered to discuss the potential of Contra Costa's northern waterfront. (See photo above)

 

Read more 

 

Low-rider supervisor 

Supervisor Glover surprised the hundreds of parade watchers at the annual Pittsburg Christmas Parade when he appeared in a customized car, complete with hydraulic lifts. When he greeted the crowd in front of the viewing bandstand, the car jumped up and down, front and back and left and right.

 

health

New health center helps integrate Obamacare & county health care 

 

The expansion of a Contra Costa County health center in Concord is an example of health care reform taking shape at the local level.

 

Read more 

 

Canyon
Keller Canyon grant awardees announced by the supervisor

 
Supervisor Federal Glover helps hand out turkeys to senior citizens.
 
residentsSupervisor Glover delivers: 1500 turkeys to District V residents 

Fourth bore opening 


The Caldecott Tunnel's fourth boar opened with Rep. George Miller (top) and Supervisors Candace Anderson and Karen Mitchoff joining the supervisor at the ribbon-cutting ceremonies November 17.


ChanceCounty awarded DOJ's Second Chance grant for former inmates
 

For the second year in a row, Contra Costa County was chosen to receive a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to reduce recidivism among former inmates. Supervisor Glover played a key role in securing the grant.

 

Read more

News You Can Use
EventsEvents Calendar


March 8
Healthcare Insurance Enrollment Event, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Fremont Elementary School, 1413 "F" Street, Antioch. (510-233-6230) 
 
March 26
Workshop on Writing A Successful Grant Application. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Los Medanos College, Room L109, Pittsburg. (925-335-8200)

April 5
Convoy of Hope, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Rio Vista Elementary School, 611 Pacifica Ave., Bay Point. (925-798-1808)
 
May 3
Supervisor Glover's Youth Summit, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Los Medanos College, 2000 East Leleand Road, Pittsburg. (925-335-8200)
 
April 19
Spring Extravaganza/Egg Hunt, 8:30 a.m.-noon, Ambrose Community Center, 3105 Willow Pass Road, Bay Point. (925-458-1601)
 
May 26
Memorial Day Observance/Derby Parade, 9 a.m., Ambrose Park & Recreation Center, 3105 Willow Pass Road, Bay Point. 
 
June 21
Unity in Community, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Ambrose Park & Recreation Center, 3105 Willow Pass Road, Bay Point. (925-687-8844 x240)


  •  
meetingsGovernment meetings

Antioch

  • Antioch Unified School District: 7 p.m., second and fourth Wednesdays, district offices, 510 G St. 925-706-4100.
  • Antioch Area Public Facilities Financing Agency (Mello-Roos District): 7 p.m., Antioch Unified School District boardroom, 510 G Street. 776-2030. Meets every other month, first Monday. Call to confirm meeting date.
  • City Council: 7 p.m., second and fourth Tuesdays, City Hall, Third and H streets.
  • Parks and Recreation Commission: 7 p.m., second Thursday, City Hall, Third and H streets. 925-779-7070, Ext. 0.

Bay Point

  • Municipal Advisory Council: 7 p.m., first Tuesday, Ambrose Community Center, 3105 Willow Pass Road. 925-458-1601.
  • Ambrose Park and Recreation District: 6:30 p.m., second Thursday, Ambrose Center: 3105 Willow Pass Road, Bay Point. 925-458-1601 or www.ambroserec.org
  • Mt. Diablo Unified School District: 2nd and 4th Monday, 7:30 p.m., Board Room at the Dent Center, 1936 Carlotta Drive, Concord.

Crockett

  • Crockett Community Services District: 7 p.m., every 4th Wednesday, Crockett Community Center, 850 Pomona St. 510-787-2992.
  • Crockett Community Foundation: 7 p.m., every 1st Thursday, Crockett Community Center, 850 Pomona St. 510-787-9708
  • Crockett Improvement Association: 7 p.m., every 1st Tuesday, Crockett Community Center, 850 Pomona St. 510-357-9493
  • Crockett Recreation Commission: 7 p.m., every 3rd Monday, Crockett Community Center, 850 Pomona St. 510-787-2414
  • Crockett Sanitary Commission: 7 p.m.,  every 3rd Wednesday, Crockett Community Center, 850 Pomona. 510-787-2992
  • John Swett Unified School District: 6:30 p.m., every 2nd  Wednesday, School District Office, 400 Parker Ave., Rodeo, 510-245-4300

Hercules 

  • City Council: 7 p.m. 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, City Hall council chamber, 111 Civic Drive. 510-799-8200.
  • Community and Library Services Commission: 7 p.m. 2nd Mondays,City Hall council chamber, 111 Civic Drive. 510- 799-8228
  • Planning Commission: 7 p.m., 1st & 3rd Mondays, City Hall council chamber, 111 Civic Crive. 510-799-6529. 
  • West Contra Costa Unified School District: 6:30 p.m., 1st & 3rd Wednesdays, Lavonya DeJean Middle School Multipurpose Room, 3400 Macdonald Ave., Richmond. 510-231-1101.

Martinez

  • City Council: 7 p.m. 1st & 3rd Wednesdays, Council chambers, 525 Henrietta St., 925-372-3500
  • Planning Commission: 7 p.m., 2nd & 4th Tuesdays, 525 Henrietta St.,925-372-3515
  • Park, Recreation, Marina  & Cultural Commission: 7 p.m. 3rd Tuesday, 525 Henrietta St. 925-372-3554.
  • Martinez Unified School District: 7 p.m., 2nd & 4th Mondays, 921 Susana St. 925-335-5800. 

Pacheco

  • Municipal Advisory Council: 6:30 p.m., every 2nd Wednesday. Pacheco Community Center , 5800 Pacheco Blvd. 925-335-8208.
  • Mt. Diablo Unified School District: 2nd and 4th Monday, 7:30 p.m., Board Room at the Dent Center, 1936 Carlotta Drive, Concord  

Pinole

  • City Council: 6 p.m., 1st & 3rd Tuesdays. Council chambers, 2131 Pear St., 510-724-9000.
  • Planning Commission: 7 p.m., 2nd & 4th Mondays, 2131 Pear St., 510-724-8912. 
  • West Contra Costa Unified School District: 6:30 p.m., 1st & 3rd Wednesdays, Lavonya DeJean Middle School Multipurpose Room, 3400 Macdonald Ave., Richmond. 510-231-1101.

Pittsburg 

  • City Council: 7 p.m., first and third Mondays, council chamber, third floor, City Hall, 65 Civic Ave, 925-252-4850.
  • Planning Commission: 7 p.m., second and fourth Tuesdays, City Hall, 65 Civic Ave. 925-252-4920. 
  • Pittsburg Unified School District: 7:30 p.m., second and fourth Wednesdays, 2000 Railroad Ave. 
  • Los Medanos Community Healthcare District: 6:30 p.m., 2nd Mondays, 2311 Loveridge Road, Pittsburg. 925-432-2200

Port Costa

  • Port Costa Sanitary Commission: 7 p.m.,  every 2nd Wednesday, Port Costa School, Plaza El Hombre, 510-787-2992.
  • John Swett Unified School District: 6:30 p.m., every 2nd  Wednesday, School District Office,400 Parker Ave., 510-245-4300

 

Rodeo

  • Municipal Advisory Council: 7 p.m., 4th Thursday, Rodeo Senior Center, 189 Parker Avenue. 510-374-7101
  • R-10 District: 7 p.m., 2nd Monday, Lefty Gomez Field Clubhouse.
  • John Swett Unified School District: 6:30 p.m., every 2nd  Wednesday, School District Office,400 Parker Ave., 510-245-4300.

County & Regional

  • Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors: 9 a.m., first four Tuesdays, Room 107, County Administration Building, 651 Pine St., Martinez. 925-646-2371.
  • Contra Costa Transit Authority: 6 p.m., third Wednesday, 2999 Oak Road, Suite 100, Walnut Creek. 925-256-4734.
  • County Connection: 9 a.m., every 3rd Thursday. 2477 Arnold Industrial Way, Concord. 925-676-1976,
  • Contra Costa County Local Agency Formation Commission: 1:30 p.m., second Wednesday, room 107, County Administration Building, 651 Pine St., Martinez. 925-646-4090.
  • Delta Diablo Sanitation District: 5:30 p.m., second Wednesday, district offices, 2500 Pittsburg-Antioch Highway, Antioch, 925-778-4040.
  • State Route 4 Bypass Authority: second Thursday, Tri Delta Transit building, 801 Wilbur Ave., Antioch. Call for starting time. 925-686-0619.
  • East County Transportation Improvement: second Thursday, second Thursday, 801 Wilbur Ave., Antioch. Call for starting time. 925-686-0619.
  • East Contra Costa Fee & Financing Authority: second Thursday, Tri Delta Transit building, 801 Wilbur Ave., Antioch. Call for starting time. 925-686-0619.
  • Transplan: 6:30 p.m. second Thursday, Tri Delta Transit building, 801 Wilbur Ave., Antioch. 925-335-1201.
  • Western Contra Costa Transit Authority: 6 p.m. every 3rd Thursdayk, Pinole City Council chambers, 2131 Pear St., Pinole. 510-724-3331. 
  

 

By Supervisor Federal Glover

 

The economy is showing signs of strengthening, and that is the best news for Contra Costa County because we rely heavily on property taxes to operate and deliver most of the services that we provide.  That doesn't, however, overcome the problems created by the impacts of the Great Recession.  We are still feeling those effects considerably.

 

In addition, sorely-needed federal funds that help our community were also cut or suspended because of the failure of Congress to pass a budget in a timely manner.

 

Those two factors have made it very difficult for the county to deliver services.  Roads have not been maintained as much as we'd like; infrastructure improvements have been largely put on hold; services have been severely cut for those who most need assistance; and our employees have had to learn to live with tighter budgets.

 

As I step down from the Board of Supervisors' chairmanship, despite these challenges, the county supervisors accomplished many things this year, including adopting a financially balanced budget for the second year in a row after several years of deficit spending.  Under the guidance of Chief Administrative Officer David Twa, the county has learned to live within its means.

 

In addition, there has been some significant progress on a variety of activities in which I am deeply involved, and I want to share those updates with you.

 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

 

The Northern Waterfront Economic Development Initiative got underway.  Staff members from the County's Conservation and Development Department have been taking inventory and assessing the northern shoreline  for future development and recreational resources. They've been contacting a wide range of stakeholders, including the cities, the East Bay Regional Park District, and the Army Corps of Engineers, as well as various manufacturing entities who are already located there and the businesses that might be interested in moving to the area.

 

Marinas, cities and parks along the riverfront will be involved in the planning process.

 

Good-paying jobs can stabilize families and strengthen our local economies and communities.

 

On January 10th, we held the first summit of all the stakeholders to discuss how we can work together as a region to accomplish the enhancement and development of the northern shoreline.  It took place at Antioch's Community Center with over 400 stakeholders in attendance.

 

PUBLIC SAFETY

 

The county is going through the planning process to establish a network of services for the low level offenders who are returning to our county's supervision under AB109.  When completed later next year, AB109ers will be able to get services in West, Central and East Counties.

 

County agencies such as Probation, the Sheriff's Office, the District Attorney, the Public Defender, Behavioral Health and Workforce Development, along with the Superior Court, community colleges, and a host of nonprofits are working together to establish this network of services so the incidence of recidivism can be lowered.

 

AB109 gave the county new responsibilities.  Contra Costa County, I'm proud to say, we didn't turn down the challenge and are making lemonade out of lemons.  We're breaking new ground in creating partnerships, breaking down the silo walls to provide rehabilitation, and the County is an acknowledged leader in innovative ways to reduce recidivism, sentencing and providing the much needed services.

 

HEALTH CARE

 

Contra Costa was the only county awarded a contract to provide call center phone assistance for Covered California, the statewide version of President Obama's Affordable Care Act.  Under the leadership of Kathy Gallagher, the County found a call center location, hired and trained personnel, and opened its doors on time to begin enrolling residents October 1st.

 

While the federal health insurance program has had its trouble in other parts of the country, Covered California has had few problems with its website.  In fact, we have done such a great job, California enrollees in Obamacare makes up one-third of all the enrollees nationwide.

 

TRANSPORTATION

 

The Caldecott Tunnel got a fourth bore which opened last November on time and on budget.  The project was one of the country's top infrastructure projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  The fourth bore allows for two tunnels in each direction 24/7, creating smoother traffic flow and fewer headaches for commuters who were often stuck in stop-and-go traffic for hours on end.

 

East county's main thoroughfare, Highway 4, continues to improve as the work widening the road moves eastward.

 

FIRE SERVICE

 

Unfortunately, we have had to close some fire stations in the Contra Costa Fire Protection District because of a lack of funding.  The decision of voters in 2012 to not support a parcel tax for fire service gave us no other choice but to trim expenses.  However, the District is aggressively seeking additional funding to maintain the level of safety to which we have become accustomed.

 

Altogether, four firehouses were closed and one was turned into a part-time station. We tried to place personnel and equipment in areas where they can best cover their neighborhoods to ensure the safety of our communities.  Hopefully the economy will improve enough so that further cuts will not occur.  Housing prices are rising and the private sector is hiring again, especially in the Bay Area.

 

As busy as 2013 has been, 2014 promises to be even busier.  Many of the projects that we started this year will begin to bear fruit next year. 

 

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waterfront
Contra Costa County's future lays in the northern waterfront

By Supervisor Federal Glover

 

The northern waterfront looks like the future of Contra Costa County.

 

Hundreds of people interested in the future of the northern waterfront gathered in Antioch Jan. 10 to explore the possibilities that the host of speakers presented to the business community, city officials, state representatives, environmentalists, community colleges and recreational officials.

 

The forum was the culmination of a year's worth of meetings, studies and research with the aim of investing in the county's "underutilized resources"  after I introduced the idea to the Board of Supervisors last year. To me, the forum was a success in bringing much-needed attention to our forgotten shoreline..

 

"Contra Costa County is better equipped than anywhere in the state to harmonize industrial, environmental and recreational needs," said Kish Rajan. Director of the Governor's Office of Business and Economic Development.

 

The northern waterfront, which stretches over 59 miles from Pinole to Oakley, has historically been where manufacturing plants have located. Refineries, chemical plants, a steel mill and food manufacturing centers have dominated the coastline since the beginning of the last century.

 

But over 60 percent of the waterfront is preserved as open space or park land with only a few points of access to the San Joaquin River, San Pablo Bay or the Carquinez Straits. We need to finds ways for people to better use and appreciate the beauty of this confluence of bay, river, hills and shoreline.

 

Amid the manufacturing areas are dozens of empty parcels that could be developed to support the existing businesses or could be places for new businesses to locate.

 

A half-dozen power plants have opened in the area in the last 10 years providing a good portion of the clean energy for California's electricity grid. A solar farm has been approved in Pittsburg.

 

Unknown to most people are the water ports that bring in raw goods and products and move out finished goods and raw material to ports along the west coast and Asia.

 

Railroad lines parallel the coast that could be used to ship in and ship out products and materials and if Highway 4 is completed and connected to Interstate 580, the transfer of goods could extend to the rest of the western United States quickly and cheaply.

 

After outlining the dredging projects along the Baldwin Ship Channel in the San Joaquin River, Lt. Col. John Baker of the U.S. Corps of Engineers pointed out that the corps would play vital dual roles in developing the northern waterfront and protecting the environment. The business community and environmentalists need to recognize from the outside that both commerce and environmental issues can come out as winners, he said.

 

Highlight of the event was the discussion of the report "Revitalizing Contra Costa's Northern Waterfront: How to be competitive in the 21st Century Global Economy," which was given to each attendee.

 

The study by the Craft Consulting Group was presented by Gary Craft reported that there are currently 180 manufacturing sites along the waterfront but there is room for more.

 

It stressed the need for public-private collaboration. He said the county needs to "look to the future: where our industry is headed, not where its been."

 

The forum ended up with several teams being formed to discuss various aspects and strategies to develop the waterfront.

 

There is so much potential on the north shore to bring jobs and to give us a better quality of life; not only for District V residents but for all of Contra Costa County. I hope this forum will open up the eyes and minds to more ideas on how we can make better use of this forgotten asset.

  

 

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obamacareNew health center helps integrate Obamacare & county health care 

 

The expansion of a Contra Costa County health center in Concord is an example of health care reform taking shape at the local level.

 

Health reform calls for providing additional behavioral health services and better linking these services with other care. Contra Costa Health Services (CCHS) is helping make this happen for residents through an innovative transformation effort that integrates behavioral and physical health care into one location at the center, said Dr. William Walker, CCHS Director and County Health Officer. CCHS celebrated the expansion of its Concord Health Center with an open house last November at its new CHC Building 2, at 3024 Willow Pass Road.

 

"This is just one more example of why the Affordable Care Act is so vital to our community's health and how health care reform is transforming the way care is delivered," Dr. Walker said.

 

The county plans to integrate behavioral and physical health at more sites over the next several months. Federal funding secured by the CCHS Public Health Division from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) helped make the integration possible.

 

The Concord facility is the first of Contra Costa County's 10 health centers to integrate the two services. This change addresses the longstanding issue of how to get behavioral health services to people who need them but don't know how to seek them or whose needs aren't severe enough for emergency psychiatric services, said Dr. Chris Farnitano, CCHS Ambulatory Care Medical Director.

 

"Having integrated services helps to diagnose and treat people for both mental and physical conditions. We are creating a medical home where all their health needs can be met. This is more convenient for patients and will have a great impact on the health of the people we serve," Dr. Farnitano said.

 

Historically, behavioral health services, such as treatment for depression and substance abuse, are often provided in settings separate from where people get their primary physical care like doctor visits and blood tests. This often means only part of a person's health is addressed, said Cynthia Belon, LCSW, Director of CCHS' Behavioral Health Division, which includes mental health, alcohol and other drugs and homeless services.

 

"Not being able to get treatment for physical health care needs can make a person's behavioral health issues worse and vice versa. Just caring for pieces won't fully heal a person- the idea is to provide complete care for the whole person," Belon said.

 

In addition to the Concord Health Center Building 2, which has nine exam rooms and is expected to serve more than 6,000 people annually, primary care also has been integrated at a nearby CCHS adult mental health clinic.

-- Health Services Department 

 

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turkeys
Keller Canyon grant awardees announced by the supervisor

The amount varies each year according to the tonnage delivered to the landfill. In recent years, because of the recession, tonnage decreased mainly because the amount of construction debris had reduced. The strong emphasis on recycling by the waste companies also contributed to the decrease.

 

Most of the money is distributed to county agencies and community-based organizations which improve the quality of life in Bay Point and Pittsburg after a strict evaluation process by a review committee.

 

This year's awards go to a wide-ranging list of programs that include activities for seniors and youth at the Ambrose Center, Midnight Baseketball and a school resource officer, a resident deputy and the school crossing guards in Bay Point.

StaySupervisor Glover delivers: 1500 turkeys to District V residents
InmatesCounty awarded DOJ's Second Chance grant for returning inmates

 

For the second year in a row, Contra Costa County was chosen to receive a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to reduce recidivism among former inmates.

 

Called the Second Chance Grant, the funds are intended to help the county develop a support system to reduce the likelihood of inmates returning to prison or jail. The grant funding is the largest amount awarded by the DOJ.

 

"Getting the DOJ grant shows that the federal government is aware of the work we are trying to do in Contra Costa," said Supervisor Federal D. Glover.

"When I approached justice department officials two years ago, they were looking for a California county to assist because they knew that the state was under court orders to reduce it's prison population by tens of thousands," said Glover.

 

"They want a program that can be replicated in other counties."

 

With the help of the county's state congressional representatives, especially Sen. Barbara Boxer, who monitored the application, Contra Costa was awarded the Second Chance Grant in 2012.

 

The first year's grant was used to develop a pilot program and measure its effectiveness. The DOJ realizes that a year is not enough time to properly put in place and evaluate the program.

 

The second year's funding allows the county, led by Probation, the Sheriff's Office and court system, to continue the implementation and evaluation of strategies that will help reduce the formerly imprisoned's tendency to commit new crimes.

 

The state's recidivism rate hovers around 70-75 percent, higher than the national average of 52 percent.

 

"That is shamefully high," said Glover, "and evidence that the justice system currently in place is not working."

 

"Given the proper coping tools, most former inmates can be steered away from the anti-social behavior that put them behind bars," said Glover. "That's what we are developing in Contra Costa and that is why the DOJ is highly interested in what the county is attempting. They want us to succeed."

 

ContactContacts:     Supervisor Federal Glover 
District V, 315 East Leland Rd., Pittsburg, CA
925-335-8200 or 510-262-8800

To arrange a meeting with Supervisor Glover:
Lynn Reichard Enea, Administrative Assistant

David Fraser, Chief of Staff

Ed Diokno, Senior District Representative

Vincent Manuel, Senior District Representative

Paul Adler, District Representative

 
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